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Blog

1 June 2022
Author: Allison Meserve
Dr. Meta Van Den Heuvel, a pediatrician at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), learned about financial empowerment, including tax filing and access to benefits services, when previously working on a study about food insecurity. Dr. Van Den Heuvel, and her colleague, Dr. Catherine Birken, received funding from SickKids Foundation to look at food insecurity amongst families with children requiring inpatient hospital care. 
15 February 2022
Author: Ana Fremont
“What if Canada Revenue Agency decides to freeze my bank account and seize all my assets because I haven’t filed my taxes for so long?” Roger nervously asked the Financial Empowerment and Problem Solving (FEPS) worker at Agincourt Community Service Association (ACSA) during his initial call seeking help with his back taxes. Staff could see Roger was extremely nervous about his situation and knew it would only be possible to help him if they took the time to listen and to understand his story and concerns.
26 November 2021
Author: Wendy Abbott-Serroul
Carla Macias, an Ecuadorian who came to Canada in 2007, shares her journey of integrating into a new country, outlining the ups and downs of facing a world where not only learning a new language is key to success but financial literacy proves equally important. Carla articulates just how instrumental the Jane/Finch Centre was to helping her embark on a path to ensure financial success for herself and her family.
8 September 2021
Author: Wendy Abbott-Serroul
The Working Centre helps Nimaa, a single mother and newcomer to Canada, shed light on the unique financial challenges she experienced as an Arab woman and helps her secure benefits and financial support. Also, and importantly, they help her find the confidence to manage her own money and budget ensuring her future is brighter and full of possibility. 
31 May 2021
Author: Galen MacLusky
In Prosper Canada’s work in developing and piloting supports for people living on low incomes, we rely heavily on the guidance of people with lived experience. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, a lot of this engagement would take place in-person. The COVID-19 pandemic upended this approach and forced us to get creative about how we engage people living on low-incomes. We want to share two important lessons that we’ve learned over the past year. 
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